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Lexington-Fayette, Ky., Saves Energy, Money, and CO2 With Smart Lighting

by Rena Ragimova Jan 22, 2009

The Achievements

The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) in Kentucky has lowered energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with the following smart lighting choices for its buildings:

  • Installed sensor activated lighting controls for select office space at the Adult Detention Center. The estimated energy savings is over 18,000 kWh/year and CO2 emissions are reduced by approximately over 16 tons per year. This also reduces our energy cost by $1,100 per year.

  • Purchased 392 LED EXIT signs in 2006. Installing tLED EXIT signs will result in an annual energy savings of approximately $5,000 and an annual greenhouse gas reduction of 104 metric tons. Also purchased 235 programmable thermostats in 2006.

  • Recently completed an upgrade of the 10th floor lighting at Government Center with more efficient fixtures which is expected to reduce energy usage by 100,000 kWh/year and will also reduce greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 92 metric tons per year.

[Source: Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government website]

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Lexington-Fayette, Ky., Greens Its Vending Machines

by Rena Ragimova Jan 22, 2009

The Achievement

The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) in Kentucky has reduced the energy consumption of its vending machines in the following ways:

  • Turned off the display lights in many vending machines. This can save as much as $30 per year for each machine and results in a CO2 reduction of over 1,300 pounds/year per machine.
  • Purchased 20 Vending Misers for Parks and Recreation vending machines to further reduce energy usage. These can save approx $175 per year per machine and result in a total CO2 reduction of over 70 metric tons per year.
[Source: Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government website] Read more »

Lexington-Fayette, Ky., Joins EPA Million Monitor Drive, Saves 200,000 KWH

by Rena Ragimova Jan 22, 2009

The Achievement

The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) in Kentucky joined the EPA Million Monitor Drive. In joining the Million Monitor Drive, the County agreed to enable the power management features on 1,000 of its computers so that they go to sleep when not being used.

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Santa Barbara, CA, Switches From Bottled to Tap Water at City Functions

by Rena Ragimova Jan 22, 2009

The Achievement

In spring 2007, the City of Santa Barbara, Calif., stopped buying bottled water and began serving tap water at city functions.

The Benefits

Reducing or banning the purchase and consumption of bottled water reduces waste, saves money, and lowers greenhouse gas emissions. Plastic bottles are made from petroleum and require energy to produce (which in turn produces greenhouse gases). Also, they are often thrown in the trash, rather than recycled. Transporting all those bottles to landfills via trucks is expensive, and produces greenhouse gases. When a city and its resides reduces bottled water consumption, it means less trash to transport and fill up landfills, and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, using tap water is much cheaper than buying bottled water. Municipal tap water is safe and is typically more closely monitored than bottled water.

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Chicago, IL, Institutes Bottled Water Tax

by Rena Ragimova Jan 17, 2009

The Achievement

In January 2008, the City of Chicago instituted a 5 cent tax on each bottle of water sold, making Chicago the first major U.S. city to institute such a surcharge.

The Benefits

Reducing or banning the purchase and consumption of bottled water reduces waste, saves money, and lowers greenhouse gas emissions. Plastic bottles are made from petroleum and require energy to produce (which in turn produces greenhouse gases). Also, they are often thrown in the trash, rather than recycled. Transporting all those bottles to landfills via trucks is expensive, and produces greenhouse gases. When a city and its resides reduces bottled water consumption, it means less trash to transport and fill up landfills, and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, using tap water is much cheaper than buying bottled water. Municipal tap water is safe and is typically more closely monitored than bottled water.

City of Chicago officials estimate the tax will secure an extra $10.5 million annually.

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Salt Lake City, UT, Mayor Calls for Ban on Bottled Water

by Rena Ragimova Jan 14, 2009

The Achievement

In October, 2006 Salt Lake City, UT Mayor Rocky Anderson called for a ban on bottled water and asked city employees to voluntarily stop using single-serving bottled waters at city offices, meetings and events. To substitute for bottled water, Anderson asked city departments and restaurants to fill reusable water pitchers, cups, and bottles with local tap water.

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Lexington-Fayette, Ky., Educates Employees on Energy Conservation

by Rena Ragimova Jan 11, 2009

The Achievement

The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) in Kentucky established an internal Energy Management Team, developed an Energy Management Policy, and implemented an energy conservation program to educate employees on the importance of energy conservation. As part of the energy conservation program, wallet cards containing energy conservation tips and environmental info (along with a holiday schedule) are distributed to all 3,300+ LFUCG employees each year.

[Source: Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government website

]

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Montgomery County, MD, powers 2,700 homes with landfill gas

by Rena Ragimova Dec 31, 2008

The Achievement

Montgomery County, Maryland installed a gas collection system for the Gude Southlawn Sanitary Landfill in Rockville, MD. The landfill was open for almost 20 years and collected an estimated 4.8 million tons of waste under 91 acres. Forty-four wells were established to feed an on-site generation facility with two generators to recover the landfill gas and turn it into electricity.  The 1,500 kilowatt electrical generators are connected to the local power grid and revenues are generated from selling this electricity to Potomac Electric Power Company under a 20-year agreement.

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